FC Dallas Midfielder Paxton Pomykal Has Surgery On His Left Knee

(Frisco, TX – May 18, 2017) – FC Dallas midfielder Paxton Pomykal had successful surgery Thursday afternoon to repair a slight meniscus tear his left knee. He suffered the injury during a Wednesday night training session at Toyota Stadium. Dr. James Walter performed the surgery at Texas Health Center for Diagnostics and Surgery in Plano, TX.

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Sports Injury Clinic by FC Dallas Team Doctors

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Welcome Dr. Raynor and Dr. Kruse to our practice.

We have added two new orthopedic surgeons to our practice.  Dr. Raynor started on September 1, 2015 and Dr. Kruse started with us on January 4, 2016.


N O T I C E – Effective 10/6/2014

HYDROCODONE & HYDROCODONE COMBINATION DRUGS
CLASSIFICATION CHANGE

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has announced that hydrocodone and hydrocodone combination products will be reclassified from Schedule III to Schedule II effective October 6, 2014.

As of October 6, 2014, hydrocodone and hydrocodone combination prescriptions and refills will no longer be able to be processed electronically or via telephone. Prescriptions will require a physician signature and will be required to be written on a special prescription pad.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOU?
• These prescriptions will not have pre-authorized refills.
• You will need to obtain all prescriptions for these medications in person from your physician.
• Prescriptions will only be written during normal business hours, Monday through Thursday, when your physician is present in the office.
• Prescriptions will not be written on weekends or holidays or when the clinic is closed.

HOW YOU CAN HELP
• Plan ahead.
• Don’t wait until you are out of medication to call your Physician.
• We encourage you to discuss this change with your Physician and discuss alternative pain medication options that may be authorized electronically or by telephone.

We understand the difficulty this will cause our patients in obtaining these types of prescriptions; however, we are mandated to comply with the new DEA regulations.


Bill Currie

Information coming soon.


Featuring Scott O. Paschal, M.D.

  • Where were you born and/or grow up?

I was born in Durham, North Carolina. At that time, my dad played professional baseball for the Durham Bulls, a Triple-A team. I grew up in Dallas after we settled here during my 3rd grade year.

  •  Where did you go to school?

Martha Turner Reilly Elementary School, Robert T. Hill Junior High School, and Bryan Adams High School in Dallas. I went to college at Texas A&M University, where I played varsity baseball and graduated summa cum laude in 1978. I received my medical degree at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas, in 1982 and finished fourth in my class of 200. Next, I completed my orthopedic residency in 1987 at UT Southwestern Medical School Affiliated Hospitals. Finally, I finished my fellowship in sports medicine and knee surgery in Lake Tahoe, California, in 1988. I also did subspecialty training in shoulder surgery in London, Ontario, Canada in 1988.

  • What influenced your decision to become a doctor / surgeon?

I wanted to be a surgeon since I was 13 years old. Influential factors included my love of science, my fascination with the complexity of the human body, and a book my parents gave me as a gift for my 13th birthday, The Making of a Surgeon, by William Nolen, MD. My love of sports had a strong influence on my decision to specialize in orthopedic surgery.

  • What are your hobbies?

Golf, tennis, hiking, and photography. I am trying to improve my fly-fishing skills, especially since my oldest son is a fly-fishing guide! I need to get back to playing the piano. My wife bought lessons for me about 15 years ago. I was diligent with practice and playing for several years, but, I have let that fade, and I would like to get it going again.

  • What do most people not know about you?

I am a pretty good photographer, especially in landscape photography. I really enjoy it, but I have a lot more to learn. Also, I have hiked nearly every trail at Rocky Mountain National Park, where I have taken thousands of photos.

  • What is the best advice you’ve ever received?

As simple as it sounds, to “always do your best.” My philosophy for patient care is to always do what’s in the best interest of my patient. “A patient trusts; the surgeon must never betray that trust.” (Charles Gregory, MD, former chief of Orthopedic Surgery, UT Southwestern Medical School Affiliated Hospitals)

  •  If you could be an actor in any movie, who would you be and why?

Clint Eastwood, because he is very cool under pressure.

  •  What is your favorite food?

Tex-Mex. I love spicy food.

  •  What most inspires you?

The satisfaction gained from improving my patients’ dignity and quality of life. My goal is to get the injured athlete back on the field to strive to play better than ever, to get the injured worker back on the job to provide for the family, or to get the grandmother back on her feet to enjoy time with her grandchildren. As one of my mentors, Pete Carter, MD, said, “We keep our patients truly living.”

  •  What is a “fun fact” about you?

I have hit two holes in one. Both were actually good shots, but there was certainly luck involved.

  • What was your nickname as a child?

“Scooter,” growing up.  I was a fast runner then!

“Doc,” during my Texas A&M University baseball stint.

“Linus,” during my residency training. It’s a long story. In short, I was an intern with my seasoned medical student team of four at Parkland Hospital, taking care of a very complicated patient with lots of lines and dressings to be changed very early in the morning before my chief resident rounded with us around 6:30 a.m. We may have worked through the night before. I can’t remember that detail, since that was routine every third night when “on call.” As my team was intently working together on the patient, my chief and I stood back and marveled. It reminded me of “Charlie Brown’s Christmas” when Charles Shulz’s characters frantically worked together to transform Charlie Brown’s choice of the sickly, little tree into a pretty Christmas tree. When I reminded my chief of the analogy, I became Linus.

  •  Lightning, while hiking above tree line ____________________ absolutely terrifies me.

Read Dr. Paschal’s Biography


Miskovsky-CV

Certification

Board certified in Orthopaedic Surgery since 1998

Honors

Alpha Omega Alpha National Medical Honor Society as President – Student Council 1991
President Medical School Class of 1992
CIBA-GEIGY Award for Leadership 1992

Training

Undergraduate
University of Vermont,  Burlington, Vermont;  1987
Degree: None

Graduate
Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C.; 1988 – 1992
Degree: Doctor of Medicine

Internship
Oregon Health Services University, Portland Oregon; 1992 – 1993

Residency
Orthopaedic Surgery: Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York; 1993-1997

Fellowship
Hand / Microvascular Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 1997-1998


Christopher Miskovsky, M.D.

Dr. Miskovsky is board certified in Orthopaedic Surgery with a Subspecialty Certificate in Surgery of the Hand. He earned his medical degree from Georgetown University School of  Medicine in Washington, DC, where he was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha, the national  medical honors society. Dr. Miskovsky completed his Orthopaedic Surgery residency at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, which has been named the top Orthopaedic program for several years by U.S. News and World Report. He then completed a hand fellowship at the Philadelphia Hand Center, Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

Dr. Miskovsky has published several papers in leading medical journals and has presented research papers at medical meetings throughout the United States. He has instructed surgeons across the country on distal radius fracture care. Dr. Miskovsky was elected by his peers for inclusion in Best Doctors in America®.

He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, the Texas Medical Association and the Dallas County Medical Society.

After 15 years in practice in Corpus Christi, Dr. Miskovsky and his family chose to relocate to the Dallas area. He enjoys spending time with his wife and two young daughters as well as playing golf and running.

Dr. Miskovsky has a special interest in endoscopic carpal tunnel release surgery as well as distal radius fractures. He is available for treatment of hand, wrist and elbow problems, and is currently accepting new patients.

Download My Bio and Curriculum Vitae


2012 List of Best Doctors in Dallas Features Texas Institute for Surgery Physicians

DALLAS, Oct. 1, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — More than 40 physicians credentialed to practice at Texas Institute for Surgery at Texas Health Presbyterian Dallas are recognized by D Magazine in its October issue, Best Doctors 2012.

Best Doctors is an annual peer-review voting process. The nomination form asked board-certified doctors to cast a vote bearing in mind the following question: Which Dallas doctors would you trust with the care of a loved one? Robert Scheinberg, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon on the medical staff of Texas Institute for Surgery, is featured on the cover of the issue.

“The Texas Institute for Surgery is proud to be associated with the highest quality surgeons and staff,” said TIS President David Helfer, FACHE. “At TIS, we believe we have some of the most outstanding surgeons in Dallas. And, having so many of our surgeons recognized by D Magazine as Dallas’ Best Doctors bolsters that belief. We are all honored by that achievement.”

Texas Institute for Surgery (TIS) offers a full range of surgical procedures including orthopedic, spine, pain management and ENT, among others. D Magazine recognized surgeons from nearly every specialty offered at TIS.

TIS received the Dallas 100 Award from the SMU Cox Caruth Institute for Entrepreneurship for six consecutive years. TIS was also a winner in the 2010 Greater Dallas Business Ethics Awards.

TIS doctors who are listed as Best Docs by specialty are:

Cosmetic/Reconstructive Surgery

Gregg Anigian, MD
Patrick Hodges, MD
Hamlet Newsom, MD
Patrick Pownell, MD
Steven White, MD

Emergency Medicine

Lawrence Hum, MD

General Surgery

Alexandra Dresel, MD

Hand Surgeons

Jay Boulas, MD
Timothy Schacherer, MD
Dennis Stripling, MD

Infectious Disease Surgeons

Elaine Haron, MD
Allison Liddell, MD
Gabre Tseggay, MD

Neurosurgery

Jeremy Denning, MD
Richard Jackson, MD
Jon Krumerman, MD
Richard Weiner, MD

Ophthalmology/Lasik

James Merritt, MD

Orthopedic Surgery

Michael Champine, MD
James Montgomery, MD
Robert Scheinberg, MD
William Tucker, MD

Otolaryngology

Ford Albritton, IV, MD
Evan Bates, MD
Bradford Gamble, MD
Stephen Landers, MD

Pain Management

Kenneth Reed, MD
Kelly Will, MD

Podiatry

Leon Brill, MD

Sleep Medicine

Nabeel Farah, MD

Spinal Surgery

Charles Banta, MD
John Peloza, MD

Urology

Brian Feagins, MD
Joshua Fine, MD
Steve Frost, MD
Pat Fox Fulgham, MD
Keith Kadesky, MD
Mitchell Moskowitz, MD
H. Jake Porter, MD
Eric Smith, MD
Matthew Wilner, MD


“Friends in Kneed” Christina Gordon featured in a recent news article

Fall Sports: Staying Active While Being Safe for the Season

Orthopaedic surgeons share tips to help athletes stay clear of sports injuries this fall

ROSEMONT, Ill., Aug. 31, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Summer is coming to an end, and it won’t be long before athletes and sports enthusiasts take to the field to play soccer, football, volleyball or some other fall sport.

Staying active is ideal for building strong bones and weight-bearing activities such as running and playing sports helps to achieve that. That is why the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) and the STOP Sports Injuries campaign is urging everyone to stay active, but to keep safety first when engaging in these activities.

Statistics from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) show the following results for individuals treated in emergency rooms and doctors’ offices in the U.S. during 2011:

  • More than 581,400 treated for injuries related to soccer.
  • Approximately 1.2 million sustained football-related injuries.
  • More than 170,600 for injuries related to volleyball.

Unfortunately, 16-year-old, soccer player, Christina Gordon was one of those people. During one of her games, she tore her anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), medial collateral ligament (MCL) and meniscus. Christina had to put playing soccer on pause and undergo ACL reconstruction surgery, so she could get back out on the field. Her full story is available at anationinmotion.org.

EXPERT ADVICE
“Not all injuries can be prevented, however many can be avoided,” said orthopaedic surgeon and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) spokesperson Jeffrey Abrams, MD. “The fact is, when one decides to participate in a sport, he or she needs to consider everything that comes with the territory. That includes taking the responsibility to follow proper safety measures such as warming up, and completing a health and wellness evaluation to determine their ability to play in the game before each season.”

This season, the AAOS, AOSSM and the STOP Sports Injuries campaign recommend taking the following safety tips into consideration:

  • Have a pre-season physical examination and follow your doctor’s recommendations.
  • When playing, wear protective gear such as fitted cleats, pads, helmets, mouth guard or other necessary equipment.
  • Warm-up and cool down properly with low-impact exercises like jogging that gradually increase or lower heart rate.
  • Play multiple positions and/or sports during the off-season to minimize overuse injuries.
  • Pay attention to weather conditions such as excessively hot and humid temperatures, to help avoid heat illness or wet, slippery conditions that can lead to injuries.
  • Consistently incorporate strength training and stretching.  A good stretch involves not going beyond the point of resistance and should be held for 10-12 seconds.
  • Hydrate adequately to maintain health and minimize cramps. Waiting until you are thirsty is often too late to hydrate properly.
  • Don’t play through the pain. Speak with an orthopaedic sports medicine specialist or athletic trainer if you have any concerns about injuries or tips on injury prevention.
  • Avoid the pressure that is now exerted on many young athletes to overtrain. Listen to your body and decrease training time and intensity if pain or discomfort develops. This will reduce the risk of injury and help avoid “burn-out.”

More tips
StopSportsInjuries.org